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Announcing the Re-launch of WPC Book 1: What do we do about inequality?

Earlier this year I attempted to launch the first book by the Wicked Problems Collaborative, and I admittedly did a poor job on multiple fronts. First, I set a release date that I thought I would reasonably give me enough time to complete the manuscript and “whatever else” needed to be done, without giving too much consideration to what “whatever else” was. (When you’re flying by the seat of your pants, it’s tough to look past the end of your nose.) So as the time drew close for the launch, the book came into shape nicely, but I had little time left for the other stuff, which ended up being some important stuff. That came down to things like having the time needed for formatting other versions (You can have our book in any format you like, as long as it’s Kindle…), and the sort of marketing build up that’s necessary to get the word out. And as a new, independent publishing house (with a severely strained marketing budget) getting the word out is hard. It’s really, really, ridiculously hard. So to make a long story short, we basically fell a great tree in a forest with few around to take notice.

Mea culpa.

I obviously made a huge mistake with this, and it’s been a hard-learned lesson. I had been fortunate enough to assemble an incredible group for the effort, who have all been extremely patiently with me as I figured this all out. And I think we offer the reader a load of interesting, thoughtful material to chew on. But that doesn’t matter all that much if the books sit on shelves (servers?) for want of eyes. To add to this, while I was in the midst of this do-over, I had to hold off on starting Book 2 for an extra six months. (Imagine reaching the finish line of a marathon {a personal best!} and happily starting to look forward to the next…before being told you needed to go back and make up the five miles you had missed if you ever wanted to race again. — Oh crap.)

wicked problems collaborativeWhen it took me a couple of months to get the book converted* from e-book to physical format (It’s complicated. The story, behind this, not the process.), I decided to pull the existing version and do a bit of retooling before relaunching it in the fall. Labor Day seemed a fitting target given the topic.

(* Here’s my “not yet a pro” tip: Having tried this both ways, it seems it’s a lot easier to start with the physical format and then convert to e-book formats from there. This may seem obvious to others, but some of us have to learn things the hard way.)

I spent the summer doing that work, getting out advance review copies, updating the artwork, and whatnot. The time has passed quickly and now we’re ready to give it another whirl. I hope you’ll give it a serious look, and if you do decide to read it, we’d love to hear your thoughts. A handful of honest reviews on Amazon or Goodreads might go a long way for folks that are on the fence. If you have any thoughts you’d like to share directly, I’d be happy to hear from you. Please do drop me a line at chris (at) wickedproblemscollaborative (dot) com. And if you could share this post on Facebook, Twitter, or any other online haunts, I’d greatly appreciate it!

Thanks for reading.

-Chris

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“What do we do about inequality?” is now available in paperback and Kindle formats. Please have a look. People may not be talking about the topic as much as they were last year, but the problems sure haven’t gone away. If anything, I’d say we’re a little further out on the same plank.

WPC Book 1’s chapter list, with contributor names, is available at the bottom of this page.

Side note: The book was written to be accessible for a general readership, but it is intended to be used as a reader for the social sciences. College-level educators who would like to check it out can request a review copy here.


Up Next

Now that Book 1 is finally out the door, I get to start shifting my focus to the fun part, making the next one. WPC Book 2: What do we do with technology?, will look at the promise and peril afforded by tech’s accelerating encroachment into our lives from largely ethical/moral perspectives. The goal of that effort will be to help the reader consider circumstances and trends in looking for opportunities for a brighter future, as well as potential pitfalls we might look to avoid.


WPC Book 1: What do we do about inequality?

Now available in paperback and Kindle formats.

  1. TO ADDRESS INEQUALITY, THINK GLOBAL | Dylan Matthews – Vox
  2. THE IDEOLOGICAL STRAITJACKET | Sean McElwee – Demos
  3. WHAT DOES EQUIPOTENTIALITY BRING TO THE TABLE IN TERMS OF EQUALITY? | Michel Bauwens – p2p Foundation
  4. INEQUALITY, UNCOUNTED | Alex Cobham – Tax Justice Network
  5. THE INEFFICIENCY OF INEQUALITY | Daniel Altman – NYU Stern
  6. IS CAPITALISM UNFAIR? | Chris MacDonald – Ryerson University
  7. THE PROBLEM OF INEQUALITY | Kevin Carson – Center for a Stateless Society
  8. TOWARDS RENOUNCING PERSONAL PRIVATIZATION | Nicholas ArcherMiddlesex County College
  9. THE INEQUALITY OF WILDNESS AND THE NECESSITY OF WILDNESS FOR EQUALITY | Megan Hollingsworth – Extinction Witness
  10. THE STICKINESS OF INJUSTICE | Jennifer Reftreftpt
  11. NOBLE FICTIONS AND SACRED TEXTS | Paul FidalgoCenter for Inquiry
  12. THE VOICES THAT ARE NOT YOUR OWN: MAINTAINING CHOICE IN THE AGE OF THE ALGORITHM | John C. Havensjohnchavens.com
  13. THE EMPATHY DEFICIT: WHY THE INEQUALITY CRISIS IS ALSO A CRISIS OF EMPATHY | Robin Cangierobinoula
  14. BILLIONAIRES WITH DRONES: FROM OLIGARCHY TO NEOMEDIEVALISM | Frank A. Pasquale University of Maryland
  15. WHAT SHOULD THE WORLD LEARN FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF INEQUALITY IN LATIN AMERICA? | Patrick IberUniversity of Texas at El Paso
  16. OCCUPY SANDY AND THE FUTURE OF SOCIALISM | Sam KnightThe District Sentinel
  17. THE “PLACE OF BIRTH” LOTTERY | David Kaib – American UniversityChris OestereichWPC
  18. INEQUALITY AND THE BASIC INCOME GUARANTEE | Scott Santensscottsantens.com
  19. THE AGE OF INEQUALITY: CAUSES, DISCONTENTS, AND A RADICAL WAY FORWARD | Jason Hickel –LSEAlnoor Ladha – The Rules
  20. TWENTIETH CENTURY SOLUTIONS WON’T WORK FOR TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY INEQUALITY | David O. Atkins – Washington Monthly
  21. THE STATE OF AFFAIRS: HEADING FROM BAD TO WORSE | Adnan Al-Daini – Foreign Policy Journal
  22. THE TRAGEDY OF OUR MIDDLE CLASS | Peter Barnespeter-barnes.org
  23. POST-SCARCITY ECONOMICS: WHY ARE SOME PUNDITS AND ECONOMISTS STILL ENAMORED OF AUSTERITY? | Tom StreithorstLARB
  24. INCOME INEQUALITY: WHAT’S WRONG WITH IT, AND WHAT’S NOT | F. SpagnoliCosmologically Insignificant
  25. TURMOIL & TRANSITION | Harold Jarche– jarche.com
  26. KNOWLEDGE, POWER, AND A POTENTIAL SHIFT IN SYSTEMIC INEQUALITY | Jon Husband– Wirearchy
  27. THE QUESTION OF INEQUALITY: A VIEW FROM INDIA | Akhila Vijayaraghavan – The Green Den
  28. WHAT YOU KNOW IS BASED ON WHO YOU KNOW | Deborah Mills-Scofieldmills-scofield.com
  29. INEQUALITY IS ABOUT THE POOR, NOT ABOUT THE RICH | Miles KimballUniversity of Michigan
  30. TO TACKLE EXTREME POVERTY, WE MUST TAKE ON EXTREME INEQUALITY | Nick Galasso – Oxfam & Gawain Kripke – Oxfam
  31. ADDRESSING WEALTH EQUALITY WITH INVESTING SOLUTIONS FROM NATURE, NURTURE, AND SCIENCE | Rosalinda Sanquiche –Ethical Markets
  32. THE LOGIC OF STUPID POOR PEOPLE: STATUS, POVERTY AND GATEKEEPING | Tressie McMillan CottomVirginia Commonwealth University
  33. POOR CHOICES | Melonie Fullick – York University
  34. THE PARTICIPATION GAP | Devin Stewart – Carnegie Council
  35. GETTING THE FRAME RIGHT | KoAnn Skrzyniarz – Sustainable Brands
  36. THE FIRST JOB CREATOR | Adam Kotsko – Shimer College
  37. LIFE IN THE TREETOPS: A CHOICE OF CHASTENING PRIVATION OR DEBASING PROSPERITY | Chris Oestereich – WPC
Paperback Cover
Click on the cover to check it out on Amazon.

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WPC Book 1, book giveaway, What Do We Do about Inequality? by Chris a Oestereich

What Do We Do about Inequality?

by Wicked Problems Collaborative

Giveaway ends October 03, 2016.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

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Corporate Executives Are Making Way More Money Than Anybody Reports – The Atlantic

On its website, the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions in the United States, has a page called Executive Paywatch that is meant to demonstrate just how much corporate executives’ pay dwarfs the compensation of the average worker. On this page, the AFL-CIO reports that the total pay of the CEOs of America’s largest corporations was, on average, 373 times larger than the earnings of an average American worker in 2014, and 335 times larger in 2015. These are striking ratios that are meant to bolster the AFL-CIO’s message: The top executives of America’s corporations are vastly overpaid, and most American workers are woefully underpaid.

For that reason, it may come as a surprise that the AFL-CIO’s calculations grossly understate just how much money executives make. While the AFL-CIO’s calculations are for CEOs at S&P 500 companies, our analysis of data for the 500 highest-paid senior executives (not all of whom are CEOs) from the ExecuComp database, which is maintained by Standard & Poor’s, suggests that the Executive Paywatch ratios are far too low. Data on these executives’ actual take-home pay, which is published, as required by law, in companies’ annual filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), show that in 2014, senior executives made 949 times as much money as the average worker, far higher than the AFL-CIO’s ratio of 373:1.

http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/09/executives-making-way-more-than-reported/499850/?utm_source=atltw

Outraged yet?

Trumped both ways: ‘Snake Oil’ or ‘Business as Usual’ – Mintzberg.org

Donald Trump gives voice to many Americans who know that they are getting bamboozled. Yet here is the ultimate hustler, the very type who does so much of the bamboozling. Trust me, he says. Hillary Clinton gives voice to many who appreciate how dangerous her opponent could be. Trust me, she too says, while offering a steady stream of reasons why people cannot. Sure we all have our flaws, but among 320 million Americans, could two not be found with flaws that reveal an underlying integrity?

How is anyone to believe that either candidate will deal with the deeply-rooted problems of America today: income disparities, the legal corruption of political donations, a warming globe that needs to be cooled, crony capitalism that has harmed so much of the American middle class? Add to this the ultimate problem: an uncanny tendency to deal with all these fires by repeatedly pouring oil on them.
-Henry Mintzberg & John Breitner

Source: http://www.mintzberg.org/blog/trumped-both-ways

 

Prison strikes kick off in protest conditions and slave labor

Today prisoners in at least 24 states are set to participate in a nationally coordinated strike that comes on the 45th anniversary of the prison uprising at Attica. Much like the prisoners who took over New York’s infamous correctional facility in 1971, today’s prisoners are protesting long-term isolation, inadequate healthcare, overcrowding, violent attacks and slave labor.

Source: Democracy Now


I can’t look at the figures below and not see this as a form of slavery.

incarceration rates, slave, slavery, prison, unpaid labor
Source: Wikipedia

The U.S. Census for 1920 counted just over 106 million in 1920. The census projections for 2015 put as at just over 320 million in 2015. So while the population of the general public tripled, the prison population increased more than ten fold (mostly between 1980 and 2006).

Male incarceration rates by race/ethnicity, slave, slavery, prison, unpaid labor
Source: Prison Policy Project

It would be interesting to see how this has changed over time, but it’s damning as a standalone figure.

No one should be forced to labor against their will-and certainly not without compensation. Click To Tweet

System is rigged for the rich so the poor borrow to get poorer – Independent.ie

The problem with this story – apart from the lack of fairness of it all – is that if these funds are allowed to move their money out of the country, the Irish tax base gets narrower. When your own state actively narrows the tax base, if the state wants to maintain the level of public services, it has to tax those who can’t avail of these tax avoidance schemes much more.

As well as looking at the fairness of these tax loopholes, I want to talk about the average citizen who can’t avail of these taxavoidance schemes whether they are for vulture funds or companies like Apple. I want to show how the system is rigged for the rich and how by just standing still, the already rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

I will do this by looking at the realities of debt in the modern western economy because debt is driving everything, in particular it is driving inequality which is forcing people to vote for extreme candidates like Trump.

-David McWilliams

Source: http://www.independent.ie/opinion/columnists/david-mcwilliams/system-is-rigged-for-the-rich-so-the-poor-borrow-to-get-poorer-35028083.html

New Evidence Helps Explain High Rate Of LGB Youth Suicide Attempts — ThinkProgress

two new studies further demonstrate how LGB youth are targeted for rejection and how that contributes to depression that can lead to suicidal thinking.

The smaller of these new studies, conducted by Dr. Audrey Ervin at Delaware Valley University, examined the experiences of a group of LGB youth in the area of Memphis, Tennessee. She found that about 37.7 percent of those youth reported having attempted suicide. Almost all of them experienced some kind of mistreatment from their parents or guardians, including insults, criticism, being made to feel guilty, ridicule or humiliation, and embarrassment. In fact, LGB youth who experienced maltreatment from their caregivers were 9.5 times more likely to have attempted suicide — but that wasn’t actually the most significant predictor.

According to Ervin’s results, losing a friend when coming out as LGB seemed to have the biggest impact on whether someone had attempted suicide. Youth who lost friends after coming out as LGB were 29 times more likely to report having attempted suicide.

-Zach Ford

Source: New Evidence Helps Explain High Rate Of LGB Youth Suicide Attempts — ThinkProgress

Tsipras Folded. Will Syriza Follow?

This is an old post that I thought had been lost forever when the WPC site suffered a catastrophic loss several months ago. Fortunately, the Wayback Machine came to the rescue!


When we last left the unfolding Greek drama, it was a day before the referendum.  I was a doubting Thomas who thought fear would lead a majority of the Greek voters to accept the deal.  I was wrong, and I was elated to be so. I thought the vote signaled a necessary inflection point and that we’d see things head in a better direction.

The elation which followed the vote was short-lived. I mistakenly believed this would bring Europe back to the table with an offer of modest debt relief, as well as extensions for that which remained. Instead, Greece’s interlocutors responded to the vote in a fercious manner. They lashed out in the manner of authoritarian parents who were dealing with unruly progeny. Not only would Greece not have their existing punishment curtailed, they would also be taught a lesson by having their mouth washed out with soap, along with a severe paddling. (No one likes this any less than they do, but you have to ensure that their siblings don’t get any ideas.)

Yanis Varoufakis, Greece’s finance minister, stepped down in the wake of the vote citing pressure from those across the negotiating table as the impetus for his departure. This worried me as he has seemed both the intellectual and emotional force on the Greek side. I’ve come to trust his thinking, as well as his word, so I hoped that he was sacrificing his seat at the table as a necessary concession (his counterparts seem to truly despise him) which had to be made to gain a better deal for the Greeks.

My hopes were misplaced. Varoufakis claims that Tsipras “didn’t have what it took, sentimentally, emotionally, at that moment, to carry that no vote to Europe and use it as a weapon.” As such, Greece is now going back to the altar with a deal which has largely been derided for being worse than that which its people turned down in the referendum. Not only have their debts not been trimmed, they were forced to put a raft of the country’s assets ($50,000,000,000 worth) in escrow, which the Germans would have liked to have handed off to a third party to manage. Fortunately, Tsipras was able to avoid that last stipulation, but with no haircut on offer, nor a commitment to extending payments, I don’t see where this is anything but accelerated fleecing. Assuming the deal is accepted, we’ll soon see if I’m reading that wrong.

The ball is now back in the court of the Greeks. They have to vote on whether to accept the “package” (think Unabomber rather than Christmas) that’s on offer. Along with accepting the treatment terms, they’re being “asked” to repeal the reforms the Syriza government had enacted in their short tenure as a condition for the “relief” package.

This is not a drill. The troika is attempting to become Greece’s de facto legislators. This maneuver transcends the ongoing financial ruin, and leaps fully into subjugation. Don’t think so? Then why would Tsipras claim that, “Greece will fight to return to growth and to reclaim its lost sovereignty.

(The sound you hear now is that of a large, highly-inflated balloon , slowly releasing it’s air via a tiny pinhole. We’re almost to the part where it shifts from a high-pitched whistle as the air starts to rush out and the whole thing collapses in on itself.)

Where does this lead?

In the short run, the obvious question is whether Tsipras can pull together enough votes to pass the measures on offer. This will be no mean feat, nor will it be worthy of praise if it’s achieved. I hope that enough of Syriza’s members will break ranks to scuttle the deal. (Is it breaking ranks if you do what you were elected to do?) This would either lead to further negotiation, or a hastened Grexit. Either seems preferable to the current terms of surrender.

What happened?

In the wake of the referendum’s triumph, it seems that Tsipras has folded like a cheap suit. Whether he thinks he’s being pragmatic, or he’s actively being a coward, the result is the same. I saw someone posit that he was hoping that the referendum would fail, thus absolving him of the decision and its effects. It seems plausible, but it would certainly be a disappointment. Stathis Kouvelakis believesthat Tsipras was caught off guard by the bank closures, which shifted his expected mandate into a pyrrhic victory. Setting those possibilities aside, I’ll note that if there was ever a shred of doubt in his mind about following through on the Grexit, he should not have called for the referendum.

Greece’s future prospects

Paul Mason noted on Twitter that the IMF debt sustainability update finds that a deal “cannot work without (a) partial debt write-off.” And as Frances Coppola points out, a new IMF report that was released on Monday claims that, “The dramatic deterioration in debt sustainability points to the need for debt relief on a scale that would need to go well beyond what has been under consideration to date.” Yet the IMF’s leadership continues to go along with a proposal which avoids exactly that which its own research claims to be critical to success.

What are the broader implications?

Paul Krugman suggests that this is yet another plan that will fail by design, and Yanis Varoufakis thinks that, “The project of European integration has, indeed, been fatally wounded over the past few days.” It’s an idea that’s hard to argue with.  And Tim Worstalladds that, “wars have started over less than this.”

It’s funny (not haha) that he should say that. Golden Dawn continues to wait in the wings as the troika continues to try to force the Greek populace into their clutches. Greek military spending has historically been among the highest, as a percent of GDP, in the European Union. How badly does Europe want to poke that bear?

Gareth Harding cites Monday as “the day democracy died in the country that invented it and the day the European Union took a decisive step towards self-destruction.” Let’s hope he’s wrong,  But I can’t stop thinking of that old line by Santayana.  You know, the one that warns us about those who forget the past. I can’t recall what the warning was, but I’m sure it’s nothing.

Anyways, Happy Bastille Day.



Update:

As Yves Smith reports, the IMF may not be able to support the current deal, and given the timing of the announcement, it may be trying to scuttle the upcoming Greek votes.

Here’s the cover page of the IMF report cited in Smith’s post. Words are not minced.

Greece, Syriza, Brexit, IMF

This post was originally published on July 14, 2015.

PRESS RELEASE — WPC Book 1: What do we do about inequality?

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

St. Louis, MO — The Wicked Problems Collaborative (WPC) is proud to announce the release of our debut offering, “WPC Book 1: What do we do about inequality?” on U.S. Labor Day (9/5/16).


The economy isn’t working for most of us. Sure, a few have done exceptionally well in the wake of the Great Recession (Oxfam recently found that the world’s 62 richest people now have as much wealth as half of humanity), but most of us are working harder just to stay in place — while ever greater numbers find themselves unable to do even that.

But economic concerns are just the tip of the iceberg. “What do we do about inequality?” works to inform the reader on a range of issues (including: wealth, income, race, access, power, and education) where imbalances foster unjust outcomes and threaten order. In tackling these issues, the WPC’s academics, activists, artists, business and NGO leaders, economists, and journalists offer 37 essays that work to help the reader see opportunities to move forward in collectively beneficial ways. (Chapter titles with author names and links to Twitter bios are available at the bottom.)

Journalists interested in interviews can reach the WPC’s publisher/editor, Chris Oestereich, via email, and advance review copies (available to academics, book reviewers, and journalists) can be requested here: http://goo.gl/forms/1FiscGY7hYqdGvGi1

Our next effort, a look at the promise and peril of the application of scientific advances, “What do we do with technology?” is expected in late 2017.

Questions & Interview requests: chris@wickedproblemscollaborative.com or 636.395.0660

To learn more:


WPC Book 1: What do we do about inequality?

(Chapter title | Author/twitter link — Affiliation)

1. TO ADDRESS INEQUALITY, THINK GLOBAL | Dylan Matthews — Vox

2. THE IDEOLOGICAL STRAITJACKET | Sean McElwee — Demos

3. WHAT DOES EQUIPOTENTIALITY BRING TO THE TABLE IN TERMS OF EQUALITY? | Michel Bauwens — p2p Foundation

4. INEQUALITY, UNCOUNTED | Alex Cobham — Tax Justice Network

5. THE INEFFICIENCY OF INEQUALITY | Daniel Altman — NYU Stern

6. IS CAPITALISM UNFAIR? | Chris MacDonald — Ryerson University

7. THE PROBLEM OF INEQUALITY | Kevin Carson — Center for a Stateless Society

8. TOWARDS RENOUNCING PERSONAL PRIVATIZATION | Nicholas Archer — Middlesex County College

9. THE INEQUALITY OF WILDNESS AND THE NECESSITY OF WILDNESS FOR EQUALITY | Megan Hollingsworth — Extinction Witness

10. THE STICKINESS OF INJUSTICE | Jennifer Reft — reftpt

11. NOBLE FICTIONS AND SACRED TEXTS | Paul Fidalgo — Center for Inquiry

12. THE VOICES THAT ARE NOT YOUR OWN: MAINTAINING CHOICE IN THE AGE OF THE ALGORITHM | John C. Havens — johnchavens.com

13. THE EMPATHY DEFICIT: WHY THE INEQUALITY CRISIS IS ALSO A CRISIS OF EMPATHY | Robin Cangie — robinoula

14. BILLIONAIRES WITH DRONES: FROM OLIGARCHY TO NEOMEDIEVALISM | Frank A. Pasquale — University of Maryland

15. WHAT SHOULD THE WORLD LEARN FROM THE EXPERIENCE OF INEQUALITY IN LATIN AMERICA? | Patrick Iber — University of Texas at El Paso

16. OCCUPY SANDY AND THE FUTURE OF SOCIALISM | Sam Knight — The District Sentinel

17. THE “PLACE OF BIRTH” LOTTERY | David Kaib — American University &Chris Oestereich — WPC

18. INEQUALITY AND THE BASIC INCOME GUARANTEE | Scott Santensscottsantens.com

19. THE AGE OF INEQUALITY: CAUSES, DISCONTENTS, AND A RADICAL WAY FORWARD | Jason Hickel — LSE & Alnoor Ladha — The Rules

20. TWENTIETH CENTURY SOLUTIONS WON’T WORK FOR TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY INEQUALITY | David O. Atkins — Washington Monthly

21. THE STATE OF AFFAIRS: HEADING FROM BAD TO WORSE | Adnan Al-DainiForeign Policy Journal

22. THE TRAGEDY OF OUR MIDDLE CLASS | Peter Barnes — peter-barnes.org

23. POST-SCARCITY ECONOMICS: WHY ARE SOME PUNDITS AND ECONOMISTS STILL ENAMORED OF AUSTERITY? | Tom Streithorst — LARB

24. INCOME INEQUALITY: WHAT’S WRONG WITH IT, AND WHAT’S NOT |F. Spagnoli — Cosmologically Insignificant

25. TURMOIL & TRANSITION | Harold Jarche — jarche.om

26. KNOWLEDGE, POWER, AND A POTENTIAL SHIFT IN SYSTEMIC INEQUALITY | Jon Husband — Wirearchy

27. THE QUESTION OF INEQUALITY: A VIEW FROM INDIA | Akhila Vijayaraghavan The Green Den

28. WHAT YOU KNOW IS BASED ON WHO YOU KNOW | Deborah Mills-Scofieldmills-scofield.com

29. INEQUALITY IS ABOUT THE POOR, NOT ABOUT THE RICH | Miles KimballUniversity of Michigan

30. TO TACKLE EXTREME POVERTY, WE MUST TAKE ON EXTREME INEQUALITY | Nick Galasso — Oxfam & Gawain Kripke — Oxfam

31. ADDRESSING WEALTH EQUALITY WITH INVESTING SOLUTIONS FROM NATURE, NURTURE, AND SCIENCE | Rosalinda Sanquiche — Ethical Markets

32. THE LOGIC OF STUPID POOR PEOPLE: STATUS, POVERTY AND GATEKEEPING | Tressie McMillan Cottom — Virginia Commonwealth University

33. POOR CHOICES | Melonie Fullick — York University

34. THE PARTICIPATION GAP | Devin Stewart — Carnegie Council

35. GETTING THE FRAME RIGHT | KoAnn Skrzyniarz — Sustainable Brands

36. THE FIRST JOB CREATOR | Adam Kotsko — Shimer College

37. LIFE IN THE TREETOPS: A CHOICE OF CHASTENING PRIVATION OR DEBASING PROSPERITY | Chris Oestereich — WPC



Images

 
WPC Book 1 — Cover Art
WPC Logo
WPC Publisher — Chris Oestereich
wickedproblemscollaborative.com Site Header

First they came for the Greeks

This week began with a debate in Greek Parliament called by the Official Opposition (the troika’s main, but not only, domestic cheerleaders) for the purposes of, eventually, indicting me for daring to counter the troika while minister of finance in the first six months of 2015. The troika who had staged a bank run before I moved into the ministry, who had threatened me with bank closures three days after I assumed the ministry, and who proceeded to close down our banks, now moved to charge me with… bank closures and capital controls. Like a common bully, the troika proved immensely keen to blame its victims, and to violate and vilify anyone who dares resist its thuggery.

My reaction to the troika’s charges, and threat of being pulled up in front of a judicial inquiry , was simple: “Bring it on!” “I shall face you”, I challenged them “in any forum you want: in an amphitheatre, a TV station, even a court room!” In the end, they chickened out and the parliamentary motion was defeated as some of them (a small party usually fully in troika’s clasps) strategically voted against. -Yanis Varoufakis

Source: https://yanisvaroufakis.eu/2016/07/29/the-imf-confesses-it-immolated-greece-on-behalf-of-the-eurogroup/

This has been obvious for a long time, but for it to be admitted is breathtaking. As Professor Varoufakis states, this is a singular moment from which to undo the horrors of recent years, and plot a better path forward. But the perpetrators will gladly stay the course, if not forced out. And they have to be run out now. The protests this should engender should (and need to) be massive. Outrage is the order if the day. Demand change! Demand a better future! Demand it now!